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Hughes / Boeing: HS-702 / BSS-702, HS-GEM / BSS-GEM (Geomobile)

BSS-702 (Anik F2) [Boeing BSS]

BSS-GEM (Thuraya 2) [Boeing BSS]

BSS-702MP (Intelsat 21) [Boeing BSS]

BSS-702SP (ABS 3A) [Boeing]

Evolved from the popular, proven 601 and 601HP (high-power) spacecraft, the body-stabilized Boeing 702 is the world leader in capacity, performance and cost-efficiency.

The Boeing 702 design is directly responsive to what customers said they wanted in a communications satellite, beginning with lower cost and including the high reliability for which the company is renowned. For maximum customer value and producibility at minimum total cost, the Boeing 702 offers a broad spectrum of modularity. A primary example is payload/bus integration. After the payload is tailored to customer specifications, the payload module mounts to the common bus module at only four locations and with only six electrical connectors. This design simplicity confers major advantages. First, nonrecurring program costs are reduced, because the bus does not need to be changed for every payload, and payloads can be freely tailored without affecting the bus. Second, the design permits significantly faster parallel bus and payload processing. This leads to the third advantage: a short production schedule.

Further efficiency derives from the 702's advanced xenon ion propulsion system (XIPS), which was pioneered by BSS and is produced today by Boeing Electron Dynamic Devices, Inc. XIPS is 10 times more efficient than conventional liquid fuel systems. Four 25-cm thrusters provide economical stationkeeping, needing only 5 kg of fuel per year – a fraction of what bipropellant or arcjet systems consume. Using XIPS for final orbit insertion conserves even more mass as compared to using an on-board liquid apogee engine. Customers can apply the weight savings to substantially increase the revenue-generating payload at small marginal cost, to prolong service life, or to change to a less expensive launch vehicle (when cost is based on satellite mass). For even more versatility, the Boeing 702 also incorporates a bipropellant propulsion system, which can lift the satellite into final orbit after separation from the launch vehicle.

Innovation extends to the Boeing 702 power systems as well. The Boeing 702 offers a range of power up to 18 kW. Dual and triple-junction gallium arsenide solar cells enable such high power levels. Spectrolab, Inc. a Boeing subsidiary, developed the cells.

The first version of the 702 used solar arrays with concentrators. These concentrators tended to early fogging, as due to an inherent design flaw the outgassing of the solar cells was higher than expected. This fogging lead to much reduced lifetime. The flaw was corrected in later versions with higher power triple-junction gallium arsenide solar cells.

The Boeing 702 separates the bus and payload thermal environments and substantially enlarged the heat radiators to achieve a cooler, more stable thermal environment for both bus and payload. This increases unit reliability over service life. Deployable radiators use flexible heat pipes, which increase packageable radiator area. Further thermal control occurs through passive primary rejection via heat pipes.

The baseline Boeing 702 is compatible with several launch vehicles. These include the Delta IV, Atlas V, Ariane 5, Proton, and Sea Launch.

The Boeing GEO-Mobile satellite system features a 12.25-meter deployable antenna, and onboard digital signal processing and beamforming. It is a mobile-communications-supporting satellite system that integrates a Boeing geosynchronous-orbit satellite with a ground segment and a user terminal segment.

In 1997, Hughes Space and Communications Company, now Boeing Satellite Systems, received a nearly $1 billion contract for Thuraya, a system consisting of two GEO-Mobile satellites that will serve the Middle East, North and Central Africa, Europe, Central Asia and the Indian subcontinent. It is the largest satellite communications project in the region and will serve nearly 1.8 billion people. The first Thuraya satellite was launched in October 2000. Thuraya-2 was launched in June 2003.

In 2008 Boeing introduced the midsized 702MP. The MP is only slight less heavy than the HP—about 12,500 lb.—but has mid-range power at 6-12 kW, although Intelsat has launched it with hosted payloads. Intelsat remains the MP’s only customer.

In 2012, Boeing introduced the 702SP, the smallest member of the family, which has been under development for the past two years and completes a geostationary series with power ranges of 3-18 kW. With the 702SP, Boeing is offering a van-sized spacecraft—15 ft. high and 7 ft. wide—that weighs 4,000 lb. at launch. Unlike its two larger family members, it will use an all-electric station-keeping propulsion system. The MP and HP rely on a mixed use of chemical propellants and electric propulsion.

Failures:

Following failures of 702 models have occured:

  • Anik F1: - degradation of solar concentrators - long term power loss
  • Galaxy 11: - degradation of solar concentrators - long term power loss
  • PAS 1R: - degradation of solar concentrators - long term power loss
  • Thuraya 1: - degradation of solar concentrators - long term power loss
  • XM 1: - degradation of solar concentrators - long term power loss
  • XM 2: - degradation of solar concentrators - long term power loss
Satellite Ordered Date Launcher Weight (kg) Remarks
Launch BOL
HS-702 / BSS-702 (with concentrator arrays)
Anik F1 1998 21.11.2000 Ariane-44L H10-3 4711 2950
Galaxy 11 1997 22.12.1999 Ariane-44L H10-3 4488 2775
PAS 1R (ex Galaxy 14) → Intelsat 1R 1997 16.11.2000 Ariane-5G 4758 2990
XM 1 (XM Roll) 1998 08.05.2001 Zenit-3SL (1) 4682 2950
XM 2 (XM Rock) 1998 18.03.2001 Zenit-3SL (1) 4682 2950
HS-702 / BSS-702 (redesigned) → BSS-702HP
Anik F2 2000 18.07.2004 Ariane-5G+ 5950 3805
DirecTV 10 2004 07.07.2007 Proton-M Briz-M (Ph.2) 5893 3700
DirecTV 11 2004 19.03.2008 Zenit-3SL (2) 5923 3700
DirecTV 12 2004 29.12.2009 Proton-M Briz-M (Ph.2) 6060 3700
Galaxy 3C (ex PAS 9 ex Galaxy 13) 1997 15.06.2002 Zenit-3SL (1) 4810 2835
Inmarsat-5 F1 2010 08.12.2013 Proton-M Briz-M (Ph.3) 6070 3750
Inmarsat-5 F2 2010 01.02.2015 Proton-M Briz-M (Ph.3) 6070 3750
Inmarsat-5 F3 2010 28.08.2015 Proton-M Briz-M (Ph.3) 6070 3750
Inmarsat-5 F4 2013 2017 Proton-M Briz-M (Ph.4) 6070 3750
NSS 8 2001 30.01.2007 F Zenit-3SL (2) 5920 3800
SES 9 2012 04.03.2016 Falcon-9 v1.2 5330
Spaceway 1 1999 26.04.2005 Zenit-3SL (2) 6080 3832
Spaceway 2 1999 16.11.2005 Ariane-5ECA 6116 3832
Spaceway 3 1999 14.08.2007 Ariane-5ECA 6116 3832
ViaSat 2 2013 2017 Ariane-5ECA 6400
ViaSat 3 Americas 2019 Ariane-5ECA or Falcon-Heavy 6400
ViaSat 3 Asia 202x Falcon-Heavy (Option) 6400
ViaSat 3 EMEA 202x Falcon-Heavy or Ariane-5ECA 6400
ViaSat 3 TBD 202x 6400
WGS 1 (USA 195) 2002 11.10.2007 Atlas-5(421) 5987
WGS 2 (USA 204) 2002 04.04.2009 Atlas-5(421) 5987
WGS 3 (USA 211) 2002 06.12.2009 Delta-4M+(5,4) 5987
WGS 4 (USA 233) 2006 20.01.2012 Delta-4M+(5,4)
WGS 5 2006 25.05.2013 Delta-4M+(5,4)
WGS 6 2007 08.08.2013 Delta-4M+(5,4)
WGS 7 2011 24.07.2015 Delta-4M+(5,4) (upg.)
WGS 8 2011 2016 Delta-4M+(5,4) (upg.)
WGS 9 2012 2017 Delta-4M+(5,4) (upg.)
WGS 10 2012 2019 Delta-4M+(5,4) (upg.)
XM 3 (XM Rhythm) 01.03.2005 Zenit-3SL (2) 4703
XM 4 (XM Blues) 2003 30.10.2006 Zenit-3SL (2) 5193
BSS-702B → BSS-702MP
GiSat 2016 2019
Horizons 3e 2013 2018
Intelsat 21 2009 19.08.2012 Zenit-3SL (2) 5984
Intelsat 22 2009 25.03.2012 Proton-M Briz-M (Ph.3) 6199
Intelsat 27 2010 01.02.2013 F Zenit-3SL (2) 6241 failed
Intelsat 29e 2012 27.01.2016 Ariane-5ECA 6552
Intelsat 33e 2013 24.08.2016 Ariane-5ECA 6600
Intelsat 35e 2014 2017 Falcon-9 v1.2
Intelsat TBD 2013
Intelsat TBD 2013
Silkwave 1 (NYBBSat 1) 2015 2018 ~6000
HS-GEM / BSS-GEM (GeoMobile) (with concentrator arrays)
APMT 1 1998 cancelled CZ-3B
APMT 2 1998 cancelled CZ-3B
Thuraya 1 1997 21.10.2000 Zenit-3SL (1) 5108 3200
HS-GEM / BSS-GEM / BSS-702HP-GEM (GeoMobile) (redesigned)
MEXSAT 1 (Centenario) 2010 16.05.2015 F Proton-M Briz-M (Ph.4) 5325
MEXSAT 2 (Morelos 3) 2010 02.10.2015 Atlas-5(421) 5325
MSV SA 2006 cancelled 5400 3200
SkyTerra 1 (ex MSV 1) 2006 14.11.2010 Proton-M Briz-M (Ph.2) 5390 3200
SkyTerra 2 (ex MSV 2) 2006 Proton-M Briz-M (Ph.3) 5400 3200 status unclear
Thuraya 2 1997 10.06.2003 Zenit-3SL (2) 5177 3200
Thuraya 3 2002 15.01.2008 Zenit-3SL (1) 5250 3200
BSS-702SP
ABS 2A 2012 15.06.2016 Falcon-9 v1.2
ABS 3A 2012 02.03.2015 Falcon-9 v1.1(ex) 1954
ABS 8 2015 201x Falcon-9 v1.2 status unclear
Eutelsat 115 West B (ex SATMEX 7) 2012 02.03.2015 Falcon-9 v1.1(ex) 2205
Eutelsat 117 West B (ex SATMEX 9) 2012 15.06.2016 Falcon-9 v1.2 1963
SES 15 2015 2017 Ariane-5ECA 2300
(US Gov 1) 2013
(US Gov 2) 2013
(US Gov 3) 2013