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Echo 1, 1A

Echo 1 [NASA]

The Echo 1A spacecraft was a 30.48 m diameter balloon of mylar polyester film 0.0127 mm thick. The spacecraft was designed as a passive communications reflector for transcontinental and intercontinental telephone (voice), radio, and television signals. It had 107.9 MHz beacon transmitters for telemetry purposes. These transmitters were powered by five nickel-cadmium batteries that were charged by 70 solar cells mounted on the balloon. Because of the large area-to-mass ratio of the spacecraft, data for the calculation of atmospheric density and solar pressure could be acquired. The spacecraft was also used to evaluate the technical feasibility of satellite triangulation during the latter portion of its life. The spacecraft re-entered the atmosphere on 24 May 1968.

Echo 1 failed during the coast period after launch, as the attitude control jets on the second stage failed and the spacecraft did not achieve orbit. Echo 1A was a successful relaunch.

Nation: USA
Type / Application: Communication, passive
Operator: NASA
Contractors: G. T. Schjeldahl Co. (Balloon); Kaiser-Fleetwings Co. (Container)
Equipment: Beacon transmitters
Configuration: Balloon, 30.5 m
Propulsion: None
Power: Solar cells, batteries
Lifetime:
Mass: 56 kg
Orbit: 966 km × 2157 km, 47.3
Satellite COSPAR Date LS Launch Vehicle Remarks
Echo 1 1960-F07 13.05.1960 CC LC-17A F Delta
Echo 1A 1960 ι 1 12.08.1960 CC LC-17A Delta
Shotput 1 N/A 28.10.1959 WI * Shotput
Shotput 2 N/A 16.01.1960 WI *P Shotput
Shotput 3 N/A 27.02.1960 WI *P Shotput
Shotput 4 N/A 01.04.1960 WI * Shotput
Shotput 5 N/A 31.05.1960 WI * Shotput

* = suborbital test

References:

Further Echo missions: